capitalize # "test" |> capitalize out = "Test" capitalize_words capitalize_words(text) Converts the first character...">

Strings Module

Modules that provides string functions (e.g upcase, downcase, regex_escape...).

In order to use the functions provided by this module, you need to import this module:

>>> import Strings

capitalize

capitalize(text)

Converts the first character of the passed string to a upper case character.

  • text: The input string

Returns

The capitalized input string

Example

>>> "test" |> capitalize
# "test" |> capitalize
out = "Test"

capitalize_words

capitalize_words(text)

Converts the first character of each word in the passed string to a upper case character.

  • text: The input string

Returns

The capitalized input string

Example

>>> "This is easy" |> capitalize_words
# "This is easy" |> capitalize_words
out = "This Is Easy"

downcase

downcase(text)

Converts the string to lower case.

  • text: The input string

Returns

The input string lower case

Example

>>> "TeSt" |> downcase
# "TeSt" |> downcase
out = "test"

endswith

endswith(text,end)

Returns a boolean indicating whether the input string ends with the specified string value.

  • text: The input string
  • end: The string to look for

Returns

true if text ends with the specified string value

Example

>>> "This is easy" |> endswith "easy"
# "This is easy" |> endswith("easy")
out = true
>>> "This is easy" |> endswith "none"
# "This is easy" |> endswith("none")
out = false

escape

escape(text)

Escapes a string with escape characters.

  • text: The input string

Returns

The two strings concatenated

Example

>>> "Hel\tlo\n\"W\\orld" |> escape
# "Hel\tlo\n\"W\\orld" |> escape
out = "Hel\\tlo\\n\\\"W\\\\orld"

handleize

handleize(text)

Returns a url handle from the input string.

  • text: The input string

Returns

A url handle

Example

>>> '100% M @ Ms!!!' |> handleize
# '100% M @ Ms!!!' |> handleize
out = "100-m-ms"

lstrip

lstrip(text)

Removes any whitespace characters on the left side of the input string.

  • text: The input string

Returns

The input string without any left whitespace characters

Example

>>> '   too many spaces' |> lstrip
# '   too many spaces' |> lstrip
out = "too many spaces"

pad_left

pad_left(text,width)

Pads a string with leading spaces to a specified total length.

  • text: The input string
  • width: The number of characters in the resulting string

Returns

The input string padded

Example

>>> "world" |> pad_left 10
# "world" |> pad_left(10)
out = "     world"

pad_right

pad_right(text,width)

Pads a string with trailing spaces to a specified total length.

  • text: The input string
  • width: The number of characters in the resulting string

Returns

The input string padded

Example

>>> "hello" |> pad_right 10
# "hello" |> pad_right(10)
out = "hello     "

pluralize

pluralize(number,singular,plural)

Outputs the singular or plural version of a string based on the value of a number.

  • number: The number to check
  • singular: The singular string to return if number is == 1
  • plural: The plural string to return if number is != 1

Returns

The singular or plural string based on number

Example

>>> 3 |> pluralize('product', 'products')
# 3 |> pluralize('product', 'products')
out = "products"

regex_escape

regex_escape(text)

Escapes a minimal set of characters (\, *, +, ?, |, {, [, (,), ^, $,., #, and white space) by replacing them with their escape codes. This instructs the regular expression engine to interpret these characters literally rather than as metacharacters.

  • text: The input string that contains the text to convert.

Returns

A string of characters with metacharacters converted to their escaped form.

Example

>>> "(abc.*)" |> regex_escape
# "(abc.*)" |> regex_escape
out = "\\(abc\\.\\*\\)"

regex_match

regex_match(text,pattern,options?)

Searches an input string for a substring that matches a regular expression pattern and returns an array with the match occurences.

  • text: The string to search for a match.
  • pattern: The regular expression pattern to match.
  • options: A string with regex options, that can contain the following option characters (default is null):
    • i: Specifies case-insensitive matching.
    • m: Multiline mode. Changes the meaning of ^ and $ so they match at the beginning and end, respectively, of any line, and not just the beginning and end of the entire string.
    • s: Specifies single-line mode. Changes the meaning of the dot . so it matches every character (instead of every character except \n).
    • x: Eliminates unescaped white space from the pattern and enables comments marked with #.

Returns

An array that contains all the match groups. The first group contains the entire match. The other elements contain regex matched groups (..). An empty array returned means no match.

Example

>>> "this is a text123" |> regex_match `(\w+) a ([a-z]+\d+)`
# "this is a text123" |> regex_match(`(\w+) a ([a-z]+\d+)`)
out = ["is a text123", "is", "text123"]

regex_matches

regex_matches(text,pattern,options?)

Searches an input string for multiple substrings that matches a regular expression pattern and returns an array with the match occurences.

  • text: The string to search for a match.
  • pattern: The regular expression pattern to match.
  • options: A string with regex options, that can contain the following option characters (default is null):
    • i: Specifies case-insensitive matching.
    • m: Multiline mode. Changes the meaning of ^ and $ so they match at the beginning and end, respectively, of any line, and not just the beginning and end of the entire string.
    • s: Specifies single-line mode. Changes the meaning of the dot . so it matches every character (instead of every character except \n).
    • x: Eliminates unescaped white space from the pattern and enables comments marked with #.

Returns

An array of matches that contains all the match groups. The first group contains the entire match. The other elements contain regex matched groups (..). An empty array returned means no match.

Example

>>> "this is a text123" |> regex_matches `(\w+)`
# "this is a text123" |> regex_matches(`(\w+)`)
out = [["this", "this"], ["is", "is"], ["a", "a"], ["text123", "text123"]]

regex_replace

regex_replace(text,pattern,replace,options?)

In a specified input string, replaces strings that match a regular expression pattern with a specified replacement string.

  • text: The string to search for a match.
  • pattern: The regular expression pattern to match.
  • replace: The replacement string.
  • options: A string with regex options, that can contain the following option characters (default is null):
    • i: Specifies case-insensitive matching.
    • m: Multiline mode. Changes the meaning of ^ and $ so they match at the beginning and end, respectively, of any line, and not just the beginning and end of the entire string.
    • s: Specifies single-line mode. Changes the meaning of the dot . so it matches every character (instead of every character except \n).
    • x: Eliminates unescaped white space from the pattern and enables comments marked with #.

Returns

A new string that is identical to the input string, except that the replacement string takes the place of each matched string. If pattern is not matched in the current instance, the method returns the current instance unchanged.

Example

>>> "abbbbcccd" |> regex_replace("b+c+","-Yo-")
# "abbbbcccd" |> regex_replace("b+c+", "-Yo-")
out = "a-Yo-d"

regex_split

regex_split(text,pattern,options?)

Splits an input string into an array of substrings at the positions defined by a regular expression match.

  • text: The string to split.
  • pattern: The regular expression pattern to match.
  • options: A string with regex options, that can contain the following option characters (default is null):
    • i: Specifies case-insensitive matching.
    • m: Multiline mode. Changes the meaning of ^ and $ so they match at the beginning and end, respectively, of any line, and not just the beginning and end of the entire string.
    • s: Specifies single-line mode. Changes the meaning of the dot . so it matches every character (instead of every character except \n).
    • x: Eliminates unescaped white space from the pattern and enables comments marked with #.

Returns

A string array.

Example

>>> "a, b   , c,    d" |> regex_split `\s*,\s*`
# "a, b   , c,    d" |> regex_split(`\s*,\s*`)
out = ["a", "b", "c", "d"]

regex_unescape

regex_unescape(text)

Converts any escaped characters in the input string.

  • text: The input string containing the text to convert.

Returns

A string of characters with any escaped characters converted to their unescaped form.

Example

>>> "\\(abc\\.\\*\\)" |> regex_unescape
# "\\(abc\\.\\*\\)" |> regex_unescape
out = "(abc.*)"

rstrip

rstrip(text)

Removes any whitespace characters on the right side of the input string.

  • text: The input string

Returns

The input string without any left whitespace characters

Example

>>> '   too many spaces           ' |> rstrip
# '   too many spaces           ' |> rstrip
out = "   too many spaces"

split

split(text,match)

The split function takes on a substring as a parameter. The substring is used as a delimiter to divide a string into an array. You can output different parts of an array using array functions.

  • text: The input string
  • match: The string used to split the input text string

Returns

An enumeration of the substrings

Example

>>> "Hi, how are you today?" |> split ' '
# "Hi, how are you today?" |> split(' ')
out = ["Hi,", "how", "are", "you", "today?"]

startswith

startswith(text,start)

Returns a boolean indicating whether the input string starts with the specified string value.

  • text: The input string
  • start: The string to look for

Returns

true if text starts with the specified string value

Example

>>> "This is easy" |> startswith "This"
# "This is easy" |> startswith("This")
out = true
>>> "This is easy" |> startswith "easy"
# "This is easy" |> startswith("easy")
out = false

strip

strip(text)

Removes any whitespace characters on the left and right side of the input string.

  • text: The input string

Returns

The input string without any left and right whitespace characters

Example

>>> '   too many spaces           ' |> strip
# '   too many spaces           ' |> strip
out = "too many spaces"

strip_newlines

strip_newlines(text)

Removes any line breaks/newlines from a string.

  • text: The input string

Returns

The input string without any breaks/newlines characters

Example

>>> "This is a string.\r\n With \nanother \rstring" |> strip_newlines
# "This is a string.\r\n With \nanother \rstring" |> strip_newlines
out = "This is a string. With another string"

upcase

upcase(text)

Converts the string to uppercase

  • text: The input string

Returns

The input string upper case

Example

>>> "test" |> upcase
# "test" |> upcase
out = "TEST"